Jul 03, 2020
Civil Disobedience, Solitude & Life Without Principle (Literary Classics)
Posted by Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau 1817 1862 championed the belief that people of conscience were at liberty to follow their own opinion In these selections from his writings, we see Thoreau the individualist and opponent of injustice Civil Disobedience 1849 , composed following Thoreau s imprisonment for refusing to pay his taxes in protest against slavery and the Mexican War, isHenry David Thoreau 1817 1862 championed the belief that people of conscience were at liberty to follow their own opinion In these selections from his writings, we see Thoreau the individualist and opponent of injustice Civil Disobedience 1849 , composed following Thoreau s imprisonment for refusing to pay his taxes in protest against slavery and the Mexican War, is an eloquent declaration of the principles that make revolution inevitable in times of political dishonor Solitude, from his masterpiece, Walden 1854 , poetically describes Thoreau s oneness with nature and the companionship solitude offers to those who want to be rid of the travails of the world to discover themselves Life without Principle posthumously published 1863 decries the way in which excessive devotion to business and money coarsens the fabric of society in merely making a living, the meaning of life gets lost.

  • Title: Civil Disobedience, Solitude & Life Without Principle (Literary Classics)
  • Author: Henry David Thoreau
  • ISBN: 9781573922029
  • Page: 290
  • Format: Paperback
  • Civil Disobedience Solitude Life Without Principle Literary Classics Henry David Thoreau championed the belief that people of conscience were at liberty to follow their own opinion In these selections from his writings we see Thoreau the individualist and op

    Jowayria Rahal

    I have always felt that my mind was an inevitable labyrinth of shattered thoughts and inexplicable perceptions of the world around me until this afternoon when I read Thoreau s Civil Disobedience for the very first time To be honest, although I had to re read some passages than twice to actually be able to grasp them, I am very content to have read this because I at least know now that in the course of history, there existed people who just like me found it hard to trust the society wherein the [...]


    Luke

    Some beautifully constructed arguments, and the writing is just as good as the philosophy Still, there are several points with which I adamantly disagree Worth the time for anyone with a social conscience and to examine the origins of Ghandi s and Dr King s political, social, and philosophical ideals.


    Brian

    Reading this after Tolstoy is like coming from the foot of a wizened sage and then having to listen to a college libertarian rant about The Man I agree with a lot of what he says in principle, and it s hella quotable, but for all the backbone he ain t got much heart.


    Darwin8u

    A fine and influential piece of writing This is a good essay for me to read when I get too comfortable, too utilitarian, too focused on expediency and economy When I feel like my opinions are noble by simply being expressed, it is nice to be reminded how disingenuous I am actually being to what I purport to believe and even feel.


    Steven

    Some interesting and salient points on humanity, civility, morality, conscience, and doing what s right There are also some interesting aspects on life, right and wrong, and personal purpose of life.Worth a read and deserving of time and thought than what I was able to give it.


    Michael

    Thoreau wrote this before the American civil war and therefore his topical concerns were slavery and the Mexican American war His ideas are applicable also to the 20th and 21st century, and fit just as well to our particular set of concerns The whole of his paper can, in my opinion, be expressed by this quote from it There will never be a really free and enlightened State until that State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and author [...]


    Geoffrey Bateman

    Just finished re reading Civil Disobedience as I was prepping for one of my classes this weekend What a powerful reminder of what an important, and still relevant, essay this is My favorite passages, at least this time around Unjust laws exist shall we be content to obey them, or shall we endeavor to amend them, and obey them until we have succeeded, or shall we transgress them at once And If the injustice is part of the necessary friction of government, let it go let it go perchance it will wea [...]


    Cindy Gu

    So we read part of this in English class, and I think that it was pretty good Thoreau takes a stance and makes some very strong points about our government, and why it wasn t functioning as it should I agreed with many of his points, and could understand why he wasn t proud with society back then, because of slavery and all You have to understand that Thoreau was a Trascendentalist, whom believed way out of the box, in things like nature and stuff, and supernatural things that are kind of obscur [...]


    Juni

    The historical references and language can make this a bit cumbersome to read at times That being said, if you make your way through it and actually think about the point of view and how it applies not only to that time but to today and the general ideas involved then you will find a book that remarks on our duty to not only support our country but to stand up for what you believe in It is easy to complain about the problems in our government This reminds us that talk is not enough.


    Angie Libert

    I don t think I am going to stop paying my taxes to make a political statement, but if I lived a simple life, with no kids or personal wealth, I think his method could prove quite effective You would also need a group to support your radical actions, to bring it out into the media What I appreciated from his essay though, was that he was thinking outside of the box, and searching his own heart and intellect for ways to make a change in areas that he disagreed with.


    Patrick

    Henry Thoreau s essay on Civil Disobedience is a powerful reminder of the duties, limits and if any the authority legitimate governments should exercise towards it s citizens Thoreau s outcry on the war with Mexico and American slavery copulates to this powerful narrative which exalts the law of conscious over civil law.


    Cristin

    I remember reading this while I studied Americana I think it s quite an essential read and felt very pleased that it was a part of my high school curriculum This is one that I feel compelled to revisit, as I think it would be enhanced by the experiences that have altered my perspective since my first reading.


    Derek Walsh

    This is an eloquent argument for quietly refusing to acknowledge the legitimacy of corrupt governments It doesn t advocate violent revolution, merely that men of conscience act according to that conscience in their daily lives Still very relevant 160 years after it was written.


    Curtis Jensen

    Fun to read during an election year Full of good one or two liners Many have supporting comments, but does lack some depth on other topics.


    Ellen

    I really enjoyed reading this It put into words what I had sort of abstractly thought.


    Fadhli Rahim

    inpiring read Some of the ideas are still relevant today.


    Joshua Horn

    Thoreau poses some interesting questions on how tightly you actually hold your political beliefs But his misunderstandings on things like the jurisdiction of the government doom his conclusions.


    Jessy

    Radical.


    A.J.

    Interesting to read about Thoreau s very brief time in prison and the effect it had on him.


    Sebouh

    Amazing thoughts, explanation and vision



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      Posted by:Henry David Thoreau
      Published :2020-04-25T16:51:13+00:00